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Does Your Body Language Convey Confidence, Diffidence or Indifference?

Nancy Daniels, Voice Coach


W
hen you are delivering a presentation, do you know that your body is speaking as well as your voice? Watch all great presenters and you will see that they use their bodies to express their feelings, their thoughts, and, most importantly, their confidence.





When you are delivering a presentation, do you know that your body is speaking as well as your voice? Watch all great presenters and you will see that they use their bodies to express their feelings, their thoughts, and, most importantly, their confidence.

If you walk to the podium with your shoulders rounded, head down, and arms limp at your sides, what do you think your body is saying? If your face is in a frown and your brow is furrowed, do you think your body language is positive or negative? I can guarantee you that what it is not saying is that you are glad to be speaking, happy to be there, and excited about conveying your message to your audience.

When you approach the lectern, walk tall with your shoulders back, your head held high, and a smile on your face.
[While you may not be thrilled at the prospect of public speaking, telling your audience in advance of your feelings is not going to make for a successful speech or presentation. One of the secrets of good public speaking is not to allow your audience to be aware of your discomfort.]

When you approach the lectern, walk tall with your shoulders back, your head held high, and a smile on your face. In doing so, you are then telling the audience that you are delighted to be there. A good idea would be to video-tape yourself entering a stage.

While many people record themselves during their practice
Exuding confidence in your approach speaks volumes about you before you even open your mouth to speak.
sessions or rehearsals, they often hit the Record button when they are ready to begin speaking. Instead of waiting until you are ‘set,’ take advantage of the tremendous tool you have in your camcorder and record yourself entering the room. Study the playback and watch what your body is saying.

If possible, video-tape yourself in an actual auditorium or hall and you will have a much better picture of how you look when you approach the lectern or podium. If you do not have means to a large room, consider your church or you local fire hall.

There are so many variables and factors that make for success in public speaking but what happens after you open your mouth to speak is not the entire picture. Exuding confidence in your approach speaks volumes about you before you even open your mouth to speak.
Take advantage of the tremendous tool you have in your camcorder and record yourself entering the room.


Walk with purpose, walk with pride, walk with joy; and, your audience will be much more receptive.





International Speaker and Voice Specialist, Nancy Daniels, has been involved in voice training since 1977. A graduate of Gettysburg College with a BA in music, she discovered the techniques for improving the sound of the speaking voice while in graduate school at American University in Washington, D.C.

In addition to her guest speaking engagements, Nancy offers private, corporate and group workshops in voice training and public speaking skills throughout the United States and Canada. For those are unable to work with
her directly, there is Voicing It!, the only video training program on voice improvement.








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