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Plain Speaking Is the Best Speaking in Public Speaking

Nancy Daniels, Voice Coach


I
f you are scheduled to give a speech or presentation, plain speaking should be your choice so as not to appear affected, superior, or on exhibit. Plain speaking, simply put, is the ability to speak and be easily understood by all in attendance.


And, it goes hand-in-hand with the theory of treating your audience as if you were having a conversation in your living room.

Lengthy sentences, long words, flowery speech, or highly technical terms do not lend themselves to plain speaking. If your audience has to struggle to understand you, then you not only will lose their attention but you will also
Do not use long words when simple ones will suffice.
tire them out. While the value of plain speaking is important at the lectern, it is also just as valuable in your professional and personal circles as well.

If your audience has to struggle to understand you, then you not only will lose their attention but you will also tire them out.
Often those who use complex words in place of a simple one are hoping to cover up their lack of knowledge of the subject or are trying to impress. Public speaking is not about impressing anyone. It is about relaying information in an entertaining manner for the purpose of informing your audience or persuading your audience to your way of thinking. The only means of accomplishing that task is to talk to your audience in language that they will easily understand.

Below are 5 things you should never do if you want to be successful in public speaking:

1. Do not try to speak with perfection. Nothing in a live venue is perfect because perfection is subjective. Allow for a mistake or two. Is it natural; it is normal.
2. Do not say your words with too much precision because the flow of your natural speech will be affected as well as the image you are projecting. Certainly you should say your words clearly and distinctly; however, exaggerating your articulation is offensive.
3. Do not use long words when simple ones will suffice.
4. Do not use technical language with which your listeners cannot identify. The only time technical language is appropriate is if you are teaching a class.
5. Do not try to be someone who you are not.

Having taught voice and presentation skills for 30 years, I can say from experience that too many people believe they should be someone other than who they are. In truth, the best public speakers are those who are, first and foremost, themselves: they speak in a language which is readily accessible and easily understood by all.

Stick to plain speaking. It is the best type of speaking when addressing an audience.

The best public speakers are those who are, first and foremost, themselves: they speak in a language which is readily accessible and easily understood by all.





International Speaker and Voice Specialist, Nancy Daniels, has been involved in voice training since 1977. A graduate of Gettysburg College with a BA in music, she discovered the techniques for improving the sound of the speaking voice while in graduate school at American University in Washington, D.C.

In addition to her guest speaking engagements, Nancy offers private, corporate and group workshops in voice training and public speaking skills throughout the United States and Canada. For those are unable to work with her directly, there is Voicing It!, the only video training program on voice improvement. For more information on voice training, future workshops, and Voicing It!, visit her Voice Dynamic website. http://www.voicedynamic.com




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