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Windowsill Herb Garden –Six Herbs for Health

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N
ature offers innumerable resources for mankind and one such gift are herbs that can help with most common ailments. Ancient civilizations used herbs successfully but with improvements in science and technology the medicinal significance of these herbs diminished.

However there is a revived interest on the subject of herbal remedies as more and more people are resorting to alternative therapy like natural medicines and aromatherapy due to the side effects of allopathic drugs. Therefore, the next time you suffer from a sore throat or a headache you may want to try a few medicinal herbs from your windowsill herb garden.

Mint
Mint is an herb commonly grown in a windowsill herb garden. It is a popular ingredient of chewing gums, toothpastes, mouthwashes and inhalers due to its cooling properties. The strong scent of mint has a decongesting effect on the throat, nose and lungs and hence is used in inhalers, lozenges, vapor rubs and cough syrups. It is known that chewing on mint leaves reduces bad breath and alleviates stomach indigestion.

Rosemary
Rosemary is supposed to aid in many complaints including increasing memory and acting as a relaxant. In fact it not only soothes the nerves, it also decreases stress and anxiety in the muscles and body. Rosemary adapts well to growing on a windowsill herb garden where it is easily available for making a tea out of the crushed leaves. This brew is used by some people to rinse their hair because rosemary is known to strengthen the hair follicles and give the hair a nice shine.

Chamomile
Chamomile produces dainty little flowers that adorn any windowsill herb garden. This herb is known as a digestive aid and soothing for the nerves. Just add about two teaspoons of chamomile flowers to boiling water and let it steep for five minute, then strain it, add some sugar or honey and drink it while still warm. It works like magic after a hard day at work.

Lemon Balm
I love the scent of lemon balm from my windowsill herb garden, it makes a tea that is very aromatic and soothing. In the early days lemon balm was used for curing stings and insect bites and when I get a cold sores I pick a few leaves from the windowsill, make a poultice and apply it to the sore for quick relief.

Parsley
Parsley is a natural diuretic, it aids in the removal of excess fluids from the body and also improves digestion. Parsley grows abundantly on a windowsill herb garden and the best way to consume it is to add it to the cooking.

Oregano
Oregano loves the heat and sun which makes it an ideal herb for a windowsill herb garden. Oregano has expectorant properties and is also an effective decongestant. This herb can also be used to effectively treat allergies due to its antihistamine properties and is supposed to have antibiotic effects.

Other popular plants that grow well on a windowsill herb garden are sage, basil and dill. By rinsing your mouth with a sage tea you get sparkling teeth, basil acts as a good digestive aid, while dill leaves are supposed to be good for lactating mothers.

It is seen that there are numerous herbal remedies you can grow on a windowsill herb garden that are waiting to be discovered.


Lisa Summerfield






Lisa Summerfield is an herb garden lover and author of "Secrets To A Successful Home Herb Garden" - compulsory reading for anyone considering to grow a thrivingherb garden. Her website contains valuable information on using and growing herbs... Even if you have never grown a garden before!


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Herb Garden Solutions
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